Specific gravity of coarse woody debris for some central Appalachian hardwood forest species



Publisher: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station in Newtown Square, PA

Written in English
Published: Downloads: 887
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Subjects:

  • Forest litter -- Appalachian Region,
  • Hardwoods -- Appalachian Region
  • Edition Notes

    StatementM.B. Adams, D.R. Owens
    SeriesResearch paper NE -- 716
    ContributionsOwens, D. R, United States. Forest Service. Northeastern Research Station
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination4 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13569097M
    OCLC/WorldCa47521723

Adams, M.B., and D.R. Owens. Specific gravity of coarse woody debris for some central Appalachian hardwood forest species. USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experimental Station, General Technical Report NE, Newtown Square, Pennsylvania, USA. Some New Zealand woods: a study of the secondary wood of ten gymnosperms and eighteen dicotyledons, with keys to the identification of the latter / (Wellington: State Forest Service, ), by G. T. Garratt and New Zealand. State Forest Service (page images at HathiTrust; US access only). The Appalachian hemlock–northern hardwood forest is a forest system found in the Appalachian Mountains of New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and western North forests occur in deep coves, moist flats, and ravines. Flora. Appalachian hemlock–northern hardwood forests include yellow . The variation in wood specific gravity has been shown to be greater among than within species[13,14], with substantial differences between light-demanding and shade-tolerant species[8,15]. Wood specific gravity integrates many aspects of wood mechanical properties[8,16] and is consequently often used as a proxy to understand the stature and Cited by:

one grid had all the coarse woody debris (>10cm DBH, fallen) removed, one grid had half of the coarse woody debris removed, and one grid was a control grid which had no coarse woody debris removed. In order to control for effects from the removal process, skidder trails were cut around the control grids. Coarse woody debris (CWD, comprised of snags and downed logs) is an important component of the structure and function of forest ecosystems, one which both influences the availability of fuel for wildfires and can be a result of by: 9. species. Aphaenogaster spp. do prey heavily on termites (Buczkowski and Bennett, , ) and ants also secrete antimicrobial compounds that inhibit some fungal species (Beattie et al., ; Beattie et al., ; Zettler et al., ). In turn, these ant traits might influence coarse woody debris. To assess the ability of combined species information of standing live and down dead trees to indicate forest stand dynamics (i.e., successional trends), the species compositions of standing live trees and coarse woody debris (CWD) were compared using data from forest inventory plots across by:

Decomposition of fine woody debris in a deciduous forest in North Carolina. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. – —We examined the effect of position with respect to the soil surface, species, and piece size on the decomposition rate of fine woody debris (, 15 cm diameter) in a North Carolina forest disturbed by Size: KB. Forest management can have multiple objectives that are generally achieved by manipulating two main forest. attributes: composition and structure. Composition. is the relative proportion of different tree species in an area. Forest. structure, which is more complicated, is the distribution of components of the forest (Oliver and Larson File Size: 3MB. Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers, Inc., P.O. Box , High Point, NC | Tel. ()   The importance of coarse woody debris (CWD) to small mammals in a managed pine forest in South Carolina was tested experimentally during summer and autumn and winter and spring – Abundance and demographics of small mammals were compared between plots with abundant CWD created by a tornado (unsalvaged plots) and plots where Cited by:

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PDF | On Jan 1,M. Adams and others published Specific Gravity of Coarse Woody Debris For Some Central Appalachian Hardwood Forest Species | Find, read and cite all the research you need. Specific gravity of coarse woody debris for some central Appalachian hardwood forest species (OCoLC) Microfiche version: Adams, M.B.

Specific gravity of coarse woody debris for some central Appalachian hardwood forest species (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource. Specific gravity of coarse woody debris for some central Appalachian hardwood forest species (OCoLC) Online version: Adams, M.B.

Specific gravity of coarse woody debris for some central Appalachian hardwood forest species (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource.

Specific gravity of coarse woody debris for some central Appalachian hardwood forest species [microform] / M.B.

Adams, D.R. Owens U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station Newtown Square, PA downed coarse woody debris (CWD) attributes. The structural heterogeneity provided by large trees, large snags, and downed woody debris both affects resource availability for an abundance of species across taxa and alters abiotic conditions, leading to increased forest biodiversity (Maser et al.

Harmon et al. ).File Size: 1MB. Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important component of temperate stream and forest ecosystems. This chapter reviews the rates at which CWD is added and removed from ecosystems, the biomass found.

To assess the ability of combined species information of standing live and down dead trees to indicate forest stand dynamics (i.e., successional trends), the species compositions of standing live trees and coarse woody debris (CWD) were compared Cited by: * Legal disclaimer: Wagner has compiled species’ average specific gravity (SG) values (wood volume at 12% moisture content (MC) and oven-dry weight) from industry-accepted 3rd-party sources (USDA Forest Products Laboratory as an example) and provides this list for free with no implied an SG value listed in Wagner Meters’ manuals or website has been verified by Wagner, this.

1. Introduction. Coarse woody debris (CWD) includes sound and rotting logs, snags, and stumps that are generally greater than 8–10 cm in diameter (Stevens, ).This deadwood is an important part of the forest ecosystem, and its roles in providing wildlife habitat, nutrient cycling, and carbon storage have been well documented (reviews in Harmon et al.,Freedman et al.,Cited by: Ecology of Coarse Woody Debris _____ Coarse woody debris is typically defined as dead standing and downed pieces larger than 3 inches in diameter (Harmon and others ), which corre-sponds to the size class that defines large woody fuel.

Some ecologists include woody material larger than 1 inch in diameter as by: The oaks represent the largest and most important group of hardwoods in the Appalachian region. They grow throughout the eastern part of the country and a few species are found in scattered hardwood stands on the West Coast.

In all, there are 80 species of oak native to the U.S. Coarse woody debris is an important structure and function unit in forest ecosystem. This review analyzed the ecological functions of coarse woody debris in forest ecosystem and introduced several hotspots and existing problems in coarse woody debris research field.

It is suggested that quantitative research should be intensified in the ecological demands of coarse woody debris for Cited by: M.S. degree in forest soils (), and a Ph.D. degree in forest soils (1 ). Research Summary Coarse woody debris is a major component of Rocky Mountain forests. Debris has many functions ranging from soil protection to wildlife and microbial habitat.

The management of coarse woody debris is criticalCited by: Coarse woody debris is defined in the literature in many ways. As this review provides background information for decision-making under the Forest Practices Code of British Columbia, the definition from the Biodiversity Guidebook(p.

74) will be used as the starting point File Size: KB. Rubino D. and McCarthy B. C., Evaluation of coarse woody debris and forest vegetation across topographic gradients in a southern Ohio forest, For. Ecol. Manag.,– Google Scholar Cited by: Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important carbon store in tropical forest ecosystems, with maximum estimates of >60 Mg ha-1, or up to 33 % of the above ground living biomass of trees 10 cm diameter [1].

Stocks of CWD vary widely between forests. Carbon in dead trees and dead woody material on the forest floor (coarse woody debris) can remain in the ecosystem for some time before it is released to the atmosphere during decomposition processes.

Coarse woody debris is also an important component of wildlife habitat in many forest types. Search the catalogue for collection items held by the National Library of Australia New Search eResources User Lists Feedback Help Collection Delivery Times Visitor Update: COVID Ask a Librarian Due to the need to contain the spread of coronavirus (COVID) the Library building and reading rooms are closed to visitors until further notice.

the specific gravity of the wood of forest trees. The study reported on here was carried out in the southern Peruvian Amazon and involved collection of wood samples from trees (70 spp.) in intact forest stands.

Results demonstrate the high degree of variability in specific gravity (ovendry weight/green volume) in trees at single locations. A proportion of the carbon in forest ecosystems is contained in coarse woody debris on the forest floor. Estimating the carbon stock and other attributes of coarse woody debris can be time consuming and error-prone.

New methods for field sampling of coarse woody debris are needed for efficient estimation of the carbon stock in this forest pool. Our results suggest that even and uneven-aged silviculture in hardwood forests have differing impacts on the volume and distribution of coarse woody debris (CWD).

In addition, the mature stands that dominate forests across much of the Central Hardwood Region of the eastern United States contain relatively little CWD compared to younger and old Cited by: This study attempted to assess the effects of one forest management practice–clear‐cutting–on plant biodiversity in a mid‐Appalachian hardwood forest by comparing species composition and diversity between two young (≈ 20 yr following clear‐cutting) and two Cited by: Coarse Woody Debris in a Southern Appalachian Spruce-fir Forest of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Anita K.

Rose1 USDA Forest Service Old Kingston Pike Knoxville, TN N. Nicholas USDI National Park Service Yosemite National Park Foresta Road; P.O. Box El Portal, CA • R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E 1.

Comparisons of coarse woody debris in northern Michigan forests by sampling method and stand type Technical Report January density, B) length, and C) volume of coarse woody debris by forest type among five decomposition classes in northern Michigan hardwood stands sampled for coarse woody debris in northern Michigan during Growth and development of planted northern red oak on bulldozed skidroads after clearcutting in Appalachian hardwoods Published: () Review of field-based aquatic life benchmark for conductivity in central Appalachian streams Published: ().

Downed woody debris (DWD) is a carbon-rich form of forest litter and plays a unique role in carbon and nutrient cycling. I present a novel modeling approach describing DWD decomposition and nutrient storage in a managed northern hardwood forest. The predicted half-life of DWD carbon was 7 years, lessAuthor: Philip Rudz.

Specific gravity of coarse woody debris for some central Appalachian hardwood forest species / by: Adams, M. B., et al. Published: () An old-growth definition for southern mixed hardwood forests / by: Batista, William B., et al.

Published: (). Coarse woody debris and the carbon balance of a north temperate forest Christopher M. Gougha,*, Christoph S. Vogelb, Clare Kazanskic, Laura Nageld, Charles E. Flowera, Peter S.

Curtisa a Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OHUSA bThe University of Michigan Biological Station, Pellston, MIUSA. Directly related to forest biodiversity is decaying wood, or coarse woody debris (CWD), defined here and in other studies (e.g., Foster and LangBrais et al.Gough et al.

) as downed logs and branches more than 10 cm in diameter. Spatial and temporal patterns of beetles associated with coarse woody debris in managed bottomland hardwood forests Michael D. Ulyshena,*, James L. Hanulaa, Scott Horna, John C. Kilgob, Christopher E. Moormanc aUSDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Green Street, Athens, GAUSA bUSDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Savannah River Site, P.O.

Box. Specific Gravity of WoodScott Lyon, Forest Products Services Specialist learning the the wood energy sector. The first wood. However, some may use specific gravity as the ratio of the oven A commonly misunderstood term in the woodworking industry is “specific gravity.” In many respects, specific gravity is an indicator of wood density File Size: 1MB.As with the larger coarse woody debris (CWD; dead woody debris with a diameter greater than 10 cm), FWD offers many benefits to the forest ecosystem such as storing carbon and nitrogen, as habitat for smaller vertebrates, and as a habitat and food source for invertebrates, and fungi.Down woody materials (DWM) are an important component of forest ecosystems across the country.

DWM is dead material on the ground in various stages of decay. Wildlife biologists, ecologists, mycologists, foresters, and fuels specialists are some of the .